Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Custom Title jon-el87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 08
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    12,597

    X-Men: The Animated Series (1992-1997)

    Decided to rewatch a bit of this. Checked out the first two episodes. Quite liked them.

    At the center is teenager Jubilee, which makes sense. With her you've got this young character, who gets thrown into all of this, together with the audience. Allowing for more organic exposition into mutants and everything. Though Jubilee, we're also shown the experience of young mutants: not understanding what is happening to them (scared). Not yet being able to control their abilities. This came out in 1992, with Jubilee having only been introduced in 1989. When you consider the time to animate a show like this, prior to that developing the show and writing the scripts (and casting actors, recording the dialogue), the decision to use her (and not Kitty Pryde, as they did in a 1989 animated pilot) was probably done not long after she was introduced in the comics. Though, her being a fresh new, teenage mutant character (whereas Kitty had been around for a decade already) probably helped to influence the decision to go with her.

    The inclusion of the character of Morph (an adaptation of an obscure X-Men member named Changeling) was so that they could have a team member to kill off. I think that was a good decision. Allows for them to kill someone off, thus demonstrating a real sense of danger for the characters. While also avoiding killing off someone's favorite character. Morph fills a similar role to Thunderbird, but, as I understand it the developer wasn't loving the idea of bringing in the only Native American member of the X-Men (furthermore, he would've been the only non-white member, besides Storm. The only man of color on the team), just to use him as cannon fodder. So, instead, he opted for an adaptation of a more obscure character. I can appreciate that, and think that he made the right move. Though, I do think that they made a mistake, not including Morph into the opening sequence of the first two episodes (then dropping him). Might've made his death more of a surprise, as you see him in the opening (thus expecting him to be a regular), and there are bound to be a lot of viewers, who've never read the comics (leaving them unaware that Morph isn't a core member of the team).

    Looking at Rogue, and thinking about the Anna Paquin version, I think that it's a shame that we didn't get this character in the films. The character in the first first film felt like a plot device, to advance Logan' story (getting him involved with the team). We first see her, when she's about 17 and has her first kiss (seriously, at 17?), causing her power to manifest. At Xavier's school, she starts a romantic relationship with Bobby Drake. In the second movie, her whole thing is that she can't be physically intimate with her boyfriend. In the third movie, she's insecure that she can't be physically intimate with her boyfriend (fearing that she'll lose him to another girl), and chooses to give up her powers, so that they can make physical contact. That's really her whole story arc in the films. Sure, she couldn't have absorbed powers from Carol Danvers (to give her flight and strength), but they could've come up with an alternative path, for her to acquire those abilities.

  2. #2
    Custom Title jon-el87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 08
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    12,597
    Episode 3: "Enter Magneto".

    Quite like all the bigotry on display, around Beast and his court case. As the title indicates, this episode marks the introduction of Magneto. We're told his origin, without it being explicitly WWII. I think that it still works. I know that there have been some online discussions, concerning Magneto's origin, in the upcoming MCU reboot (though, how they know that the MCU X-Men franchise will center around the same exact characters, as the Fox X-Men franchise did, I have no idea. In fact, if I had Fiege's ear, I'd advice against it. Use any of the other thousands of X-Men characters), if it will keep the WWII backstory (which would mean that Magneto would be pushing a hundred, by the time of the next X-Men film, if he's in it).

    I like that Jubilee, a teenager and brand-new recruit (joining the team five minutes before this), isn't brought with them on the mission. Xavier is right, it would be too dangerous for her. She's too inexperienced, to be joining the team (in the field) at this time.

    Episode 4: "Deadly Reunions".

    Liked Xavier trying to enter Sabretooth's mind, but being unable to access certain parts. Shows limitations to his telepathy. Preventing it from being too much of a deus ex machina, that you're left wondering why they don't just use his telepathy to solve the problem, every episode.

  3. #3
    Custom Title jon-el87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 08
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    12,597
    Episode 5: "Captive Hearts".

    That moment, when you look at this one 20-something minute long episode... and realize that Storm probably gets more character development, in this one episode, than in all six films featuring her combined.

    The X-Men encounter the Morlocks. Sadly, this was a few years too early for Marrow to make an appearance. She could've been an interesting contrast with Jubilee. Have them both be teenage girls, but Marrow is someone with a physical mutation, while Jubilee can walk into any room and pass for a regular human.

    I like that the episode has the Morlock leader being attracted to, and wanting Cyclops at her side. Rather than it being the more conventional way, of the leader being a guy, who is attracted to the woman (in this case, Jean) and wants her by his side.

  4. #4
    Custom Title jon-el87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 08
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    12,597
    Episodes 6 & 7: "Cold Vengeance/Slave Island".

    Jubilee gets to go on a mission. I like that they held off bringing her (a minor) into the field, until now, when it looks like it's mission to just check out a vacation spot, that might be mutant friendly. Keeps it from looking like the X-Men are utilizing child soldiers.

    Minor nitpick: Mystique is among the captured mutants, while "The Cure" (taking place shortly after) depicts her as having been in the service of Apocalypse and impersonating a scientist for, presumably, some time.
    Last edited by jon-el87; 09-25-2021 at 10:39 AM.

  5. #5
    Custom Title jon-el87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 08
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    12,597
    Episode 10: "The Unstoppable Juggernaut".

    This was actually the first episode of this series, that I ever saw.

    Nice move, using Rogue trying to absorb Juggernaut's power, to get some exposition out there.

    Also liked Colossus' line about needing to find his sister. Gives the feeling that these mutants, who drops by for an episode, have lives and adventures of their own.

  6. #6
    Custom Title jon-el87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 08
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    12,597
    Season 2, episodes 1 & 2: "Till Death Do Us Part".

    The return of Morph. Originally only intended to be a one-off, to be killed off, the character apparently proved so popular, that it was decided to have him come back. Makes for an interesting dynamic. This two-parter also features Mister Sinister. As I was watching it I thought: "Mister Sinister needs to be the villain of the next X-Men film".

  7. #7
    Custom Title jon-el87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 08
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    12,597
    Season 2, episode 3: "Whatever It Takes".

    Nice exploration of Storm's past. While that they have Wolverine off in Brazil, while Storm and Rogue is in Africa (at the same time that Xavier and Magneto finds themselves in the Savage Lands). Thought that the multiple stories worked. In fact, I found it even more impressive, when I compared it to some other stuff (that shall remain unnamed). Liked that they connected the escape of the Shadow King back to the events of "Days of Future Past". Utilizing existing continuity to motivate further stories. Must say that I feel like the connection between episodes feels stronger than a lot of live-action shows of this time period.

  8. #8
    Custom Title jon-el87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 08
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    12,597
    Season 2, episode 5: "Repo Man".

    An adaptation of Uncanny X-Men #120, the first appearance of Alpha Flight. Of course, this isn't the first appearance of all the Alpha Flight members, on this show. Aurora and Northstar showed up in Genosha, in season 1. This episode aired the year after Northstar officially came out as gay. Of course, due to this being an early 90s kids show, and the fact that it takes like nine months just to animate an episode (with the episode being written before that), that matter isn't addressed. Though, outside of Vindicator, none of the Alpha Flight members are fleshed out much.

  9. #9
    Custom Title jon-el87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 08
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    12,597
    Season 2, episode 9: "A Rogue's Tale".

    An exploration of the origins of Rogue.

    As I was watching this episode I thought to myself: "Seriously? People want this to happen in the MCU?!" What Rogue does is a horrible violation of Carol. In this episode, Carol outright says that Rogue stole everything from her. Her whole life. While Rogue didn't mean to, her action still harmed someone... she might've harmed even more. Carol was a Jane Doe, in the hospital. Her loved ones and family might've spent years, not knowing what happened to her. Yet, people want this to happen in the MCU. And for what? So that Rogue could gain super strength and flight? Find an alternate. If Rogue has to gain those abilities from Carol (which, in the MCU, would lead to questions about why Rogue doesn't manifest any of her energy powers or ability to fly fast through space), just have her siphon off a little (resulting in Rogue developing strength and flight). By accident. Don't put Carol in a coma or anything, that risks making Rogue come off as a horrible monster.

    At least the episode ends on a hopeful note, with Rogue touching Carol again (seemingly restoring her mind to her body). Of course, in the comics, Carol was still left traumatized by the experience. She managed to regain her memories, but not the emotional bonds to those memories. Of course, that wasn't even the worst thing, that Marvel did to Carol Danvers in the early 1980s. Who could forget that horrific misogynistic story, where they had Carol raped, impregnanted, then gave birth to her own rapist... and falling in love with him. Yeah, that actually happened.

  10. #10
    Custom Title jon-el87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 08
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    12,597
    Season 2, episodes 7 & 8: "Time Fugitives".

    Liked the bit where they establish that Jubilee still haven't learned to fully control her powers.

    Cable's appearance here feels like it contradicts his season one appearances. Here he's got his robotic arm (whereas both his arms looked normal, in season one), and no one seems to remember meeting him before (apart from a possible throwaway line from Rogue, but nothing from Gambit).

    Mutants are blamed for a mysterious virus. Feels a bit topical today (with all the Asian hate, related to COVID-19). Of course, this came out in the early 90s. The world was still in the grips of the AIDS-crisis. A lot of ignorance and misinformation going around (resulting in fear and homophobia against gay men. Heck, you could get fired, if someone just thought that you looked gay).

    I like that they left both Bishop's and Cable's futures vague, rather than establishing the two as utopias. Taking away any tension from the present day stories, because we know that everything will work out in the end.
    Last edited by jon-el87; 09-27-2021 at 09:03 AM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •