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  1. #61
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    I thought this tumblr post said what I wanted to say much better than I could (or at least from another angle). I thought it was better for the blogger to keep it anonymous. However, I see your point, and I'll try to stick to my own views in these discussions in the future. As I've said before, my discontent with Felicity's character portrayal doesn't only concern this episode, or whatever statements Guggenheim has made in interviews etc. So, my reaction to "Dangerous Liasions" was that it put the writers' flawed writing for Felicity in relief, in this episode that was supposed to give her a somewhat different and "dark" storyline (can we at least agree that this was one of the producers' talking points?). @Costas made som good observations, and I followed up with this post, which specifically concerns her relationship with Oliver.

    Whether it was my misinterpretation of the producers' talking points, or my own feelings during this episode, all I saw was more of the same when it comes to how the writers treat Felicity and the Oliver/Felicity relationship: Felicity praise from Diggle, Oliver being apologetic, nobody really challenging Felicity or trying to stop her (although they could have made things harder for her), Felicity not showing any discernable remorse or regret. There was also the introduction of plot devices that would make her look good despite her involvement with a nefarious hacker organization, e.g. Alena giving her that heartbeat detector MCGuffin or the supposed cyber terrorists using rubber bullets. I know that there are other characters who also get a pass when they screw up or behave in a way that might damage the team/other characters, but with Felicity this is a pattern.

    In fact, in Felicity's case it's often as if the action is magically transformed from gritty superhero fiction to this CW fairy tale where Felicity can do almost anything without repercussions, as when she walked up and confronted the Mighty Ra's al Ghul at Nanda Parbat. In this case, instead of wondering who this impertinent girl/women is and what her punishment should be, Ra's praised her for her "fire within" and then he told her a sad love story to convince her to seize the moment and make love to Oliver, thus becoming another in fiction Olicity shipper! These scenes are so tonally different that they stand out and make her look a bit like a fairy tale princess, rather than the realistically portrayed, strong female character that the writers' might believe that they are portraying.
    Last edited by evaba; 05-02-2017 at 02:24 AM.

  2. #62
    It's the mileage... costas22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by evaba View Post
    Here is a good description of how Felicity could have acted towards Oliver in this episode, a version that might have prompted less severe critiques from the non-oliciter fandom:
    Thanks for bringing the comment in here. It's always good to hear where other fans stand on matters like this. Personally speaking, I definitely would have warmed up a bit more to Felicity if I saw some kind of remorse on Felicity's part. It's not rocket science, really. Sometimes characters have to be shown to be more vulnerable just to make the viewer relate to them more. It's hard to relate to a character (male or female, it's irrelevant) who's always portrayed to be in the right, no matter how controversial their actions are. Especially when we reach the point where the characters around this person are thrown under the bus just to prop said person up. It's getting beyond tiring. I remember recently when someone asked Guggenheim on twitter if William-gate will be addressed again and that fan demanded that Felicity better not apologize for anything. Is she prohibited from being wrong?

    That said, the problem in this scene isn't just Felicity's stance. It's Oliver's. For me, the final scene at the bunker should have been on equal footing: If Felicity is apologetic, Oliver should show compassion and try to help her. If Felicity is defiant about her actions, then by all means Oliver should stand his ground and call her out over them.

    This is who Oliver should have been:


    Not this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_VIE7kGpWk

    Oliver's demeanor in those two scenes is night and day, isn't it? And one could even go as far as say that Laurel had more legitimate gripes with him in 2.14 than Felicity did in 5.19. But it didn't matter to him, because he told Laurel what she needed to hear at that very moment. And to be honest, this scene is where any dislike I had for Laurel finally wore off.

    So yes. Felicity's dark storyline did feel like more of the same, because the Olicity dynamic in it was the same it's always been and because once again, no one else took her to task over her actions.
    Last edited by costas22; 05-02-2017 at 02:14 AM.

  3. #63
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    This scene makes me even more uncomfortable the second time around. Oliver seems to be borderline depressive, and Felicity comes off as weirdly distant, cold and unfeeling. This is just me, of course, but if this scene (and many other scenes) are supposed to represent some fundamentally ideal, compassionate and trusting partnership between two adults, the writers (or directors) are doing something seriously wrong.

    I think it's engaging and interesting to watch couples go through conflicts and dark patches in their relationship, so it's not the conflict or lack of mutual understanding that is the problem. It's the fact that Oliver is so often put in an inferior position in relation to Felicity, where it seems as though he is in the wrong, although the story facts, or the character interaction reveal or show something else. I think it's this disconnect between what the writers are tryng to tell us (e.g. "Felicity's superpower is empathy", or "Felicity is Oliver's light") and what is actually shown on screen that makes the Oliver/Felicity relationship so problematic.
    Last edited by evaba; 05-02-2017 at 05:19 AM.

  4. #64
    Site Groupie Shelby Kent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by costas22 View Post
    ... It's hard to relate to a character (male or female, it's irrelevant) who's always portrayed to be in the right, no matter how controversial their actions are.
    This is why I generally liked Chloe Sullivan in Smallville. She was strong-minded, smart, opinionated, proactive, passionate but she didn't have to always be portrayed as "right". And often when she messed up, not only did others call her out on it, but she herself was able to concede her errors and feel remorse. It takes a strong person to admit when they're wrong or have violated boundaries etc. Some people/characters may display a kind of surface or superficial confidence, but the people/characters whom I truly consider confident are those who can admit they are in error at times and can admit to feelings of remorse/vulnerability . I actually think when people/characters are not capable of doing this (and as I say that it brings to mind a particular political entity in my country right now, lol) it's a sign of some kind of weakness, or fear, or perhaps total lack of ability to be reflective and insightful (ie lack of wisdom). Confidence + wisdom = strength. Confidence without wisdom = well, not too many good things IMO that's for sure! Anyway, generally I thought Chloe displayed a nice blend of confidence (not ALL the time, and that's good b/c IMO no one should ever ALWAYS be confident) plus she was capable of reflecting, using insight, recognizing/admitting mistakes and growing from them.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by BkWurm1 View Post
    To be fair, Alena interrupted her as Felicity was haranguing her for killing the agent and laid out the only way Felicity was going to get Chase was by helping Helix even more by breaking out Cayden James. We don't know if their working relationship would have even continued if not for Chase being top priority.
    Maybe my problem here is Felicity's idea that Chase is the top priority. Chase so far has killed a few innocent people to get Oliver's attention, tortured Oliver and is a threat to his friends. But this can hardly compare to the kind of threat Hive had been, or even the untertaking or that virus attack in Honkong in the the flashbacks third year. If Oliver died, what would Chase do? In fact, we had a similar situation in season two with Slade, and here Oliver wanted to go to Slade and tell him to kill him (after Slade had killed his mother). Now, again, Oliver seems okay with Chase killing him.

    Oliver does whatever it takes when the stakes are high, but not to save himself or even his friends/family. I doubt he would have done whatever it takes even to save Thea in season three flashbacks. He was willing to be an assassin working for ARGUS to save his sister, but I think he would have killed himself before helping Fyres to start a war or let loose that virus in Hongkong. And even when he killed that guy in Hongkong he did everything in his power to find out who he had been and why ARGUS had wanted him dead.

    But I don't see Felicity doing this. Maybe she had infiltrated Helix or investigated them and their ultimate agenda before doing what they wanted, but it was not shown on screen. To set free an unknown potential threat that could easily be as lethal for the majority of humankind as Hive had been just for the sake of a mere Adrian Chase is not responsible if you ask me.

    Quote Originally Posted by BkWurm1 View Post
    Felicity did believe that Alena didn't mean to kill the Agent
    Yes, but why? She had no reason to believe her. It seems to me that because Oliver had killed so many people Felicity simply has grown used to it. She does not question it any more.

    Quote Originally Posted by BkWurm1 View Post
    and based on Alena's subsequent actions, (hiring people that knew what they were doing, using rubber bullets) I believe that too (even as I believe Alena will eventually not be bothered if she doesn't "accidentally" kill the next victim)
    Or Alena had them use rubber bullets because she feared that Felicity would turn on them if she didn't. Alena has nicely manipulated Felicity from the beginning.

    Quote Originally Posted by BkWurm1 View Post
    But I do think that was part of the cost Felicity had calculated.
    And why didn't she talk about this with her team? Why not tell them about it all, why not convince them that this was the right choice - or only choice? Oliver goes solo, too, yes, but when things go wrong he blames himself, too. I think Felicity tries to be like Oliver, but she does not have the, well, almost paranoid fear that her choices could be wrong. Not her fault, she had not have to face bad or impossible choices and their outcome like Oliver did. Yes, there was the atomic bomb, but her choice was a logical one, not an emotional one. So even after that she does not fear that her choices might be bad.

    Quote Originally Posted by BkWurm1 View Post
    She was working with people that under other circumstances she may not have continued to trust. But they were the only guaranteed path to Chase so she "sold her soul" per Oliver and forgave Alena and backed her up. Lack of dithering IMO doesn't mean she didn't understand the morally questionable part of what she was doing. It's just that she was willing to bear that burden. She said as much.
    Did she sell her soul? Does she feel it? Would she really feel responsible if it turned out that Helix was a second Hive and bound to destroy the world? Even now she feels so sure her choice was right that she tells Oliver he should never have doubted her. They are partners but she treats him like her subordinate. Is he not entitled to his own opinion? And as a team, is he not entitled to know what she plans, especially as her choices might destroy the world?

    It is the big unknown that I consider fishy here. When Oliver went solo, as with Ras' al Gul, he knew what he dealt with. He knew the stakes (especially after his chat with Malcom), he knew the possible outcomes, and he certainly didn't blame his team for being angry about leaving them in the dark about his plans. But I don't see Felicity knowing what she deals with and blaming Oliver for being miffed because of her leaving him in the dark does not show respect to the members of her team, IMO.

    But maybe the next episode will cast a new light on the situation.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shelby Kent View Post
    This is why I generally liked Chloe Sullivan in Smallville. She was strong-minded, smart, opinionated, proactive, passionate but she didn't have to always be portrayed as "right". And often when she messed up, not only did others call her out on it, but she herself was able to concede her errors and feel remorse.
    This!

    Chloe is quite different than Felicity. In fact, Felicity is closer to Lana than Chloe - though of course they are not identical.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by BkWurm1 View Post
    =Kal El's Equal;8175942]
    Just two episodes ago Oliver turned his back on the whole team and backed the Bratva against them. And yet they were willing to let him back on the team.
    But Oliver knew the Bratva inside out. He knew Anatoly and the general agenda and capability of everybody in the Bratva and I think Oliver feels sure that if push comes to pull he can take out the whole Bratva by himself. So does Anatoly. But if Helix becomes a threat to what Felicity believes in, is she sure to be able to destroy Helix? To me it seems as if they played her not the other way round. What Felicity did was way more dangerous than anything Oliver ever did, simply because she did not do her homework before making a decision.

    If you ask me I actually hope that we will have Helix as enemy in season six and I hope Felicity will finally feel that there is a lot she still has to learn.

  8. #68
    Board Master Dagenspear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by costas22 View Post
    This is who Oliver should have been:

    Oliver's demeanor in those two scenes is night and day, isn't it? And one could even go as far as say that Laurel had more legitimate gripes with him in 2.14 than Felicity did in 5.19. But it didn't matter to him, because he told Laurel what she needed to hear at that very moment. And to be honest, this scene is where any dislike I had for Laurel finally wore off.
    I don't want Oliver to ever be a whiny, emotionally abusive, bordeline sociopathic hypocrite, telling an alcoholic to go get drunk on him, like he was here. Laurel didn't need to hear it. Oliver was wrong 100% for this. He had no right to say anything, his words were lies and fallacies, he was being a hypocrite and he was just a bad friend, even if she wasn't his supposed friend his actions here would still be bad. Have avery great day!

    God bless you all!

  9. #69
    It's the mileage... costas22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shelby Kent View Post
    This is why I generally liked Chloe Sullivan in Smallville. She was strong-minded, smart, opinionated, proactive, passionate but she didn't have to always be portrayed as "right". And often when she messed up, not only did others call her out on it, but she herself was able to concede her errors and feel remorse. It takes a strong person to admit when they're wrong or have violated boundaries etc. Some people/characters may display a kind of surface or superficial confidence, but the people/characters whom I truly consider confident are those who can admit they are in error at times and can admit to feelings of remorse/vulnerability . I actually think when people/characters are not capable of doing this (and as I say that it brings to mind a particular political entity in my country right now, lol) it's a sign of some kind of weakness, or fear, or perhaps total lack of ability to be reflective and insightful (ie lack of wisdom). Confidence + wisdom = strength. Confidence without wisdom = well, not too many good things IMO that's for sure! Anyway, generally I thought Chloe displayed a nice blend of confidence (not ALL the time, and that's good b/c IMO no one should ever ALWAYS be confident) plus she was capable of reflecting, using insight, recognizing/admitting mistakes and growing from them.
    Well pointed out. While I agree with Freawaru that Felicity has become more like the Lana of Arrow, I see where you are coming from. After all, Felicity did start out as a Chloe Sullivan equivalent. And there was a time when Chloe went through her own dark storyline (after also losing a loved one) and the whole thing wasn't as smooth as it was here with Felicity. She clashed heads with Clark a lot and isolated herself to a degree. It was only towards the end of the season she began to realize that she had gone too far. It was by no means a perfect storyline, but it did go full circle and imo Clark's integrity wasn't compromised in this just to make Chloe look good.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dagenspear View Post
    I don't want Oliver to ever be a whiny, emotionally abusive, bordeline sociopathic hypocrite, telling an alcoholic to go get drunk on him, like he was here. Laurel didn't need to hear it. Oliver was wrong 100% for this. He had no right to say anything, his words were lies and fallacies, he was being a hypocrite and he was just a bad friend, even if she wasn't his supposed friend his actions here would still be bad. Have avery great day!

    God bless you all!
    Yeah, she did. If someone is going to launch an unfair tirade at another person for their life hitting rock bottom, said person has every right to defend himself or herself. Oliver starts his speech by acknowledging he hurt Laurel to a degree and then goes on to name a number of things she unjustifiably pins on him (like her drinking and losing her job). Following that, he rightly tells her that she isn't the only one who's dealing with family issues and that she should stop acting as if she has it worse than everyone else. How are those fallacies and lies?

    Prompting her to go and drink was purely out of frustration because in the weeks leading up to that he noticed her spiraling and couldn't get through to her. What was he supposed to do? Keep being polite and letting her deteriorate? Sometimes tough love is required (and it's exactly what Felicity needed in 5.19 as well). And as it turns out, Oliver's behavior here was exactly the kick up the butt Laurel needed to turn her life around. So while he was "100% wrong", he must have done something right...

  10. #70
    Board Master Dagenspear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by costas22 View Post
    Yeah, she did. If someone is going to launch an unfair tirade at another person for their life hitting rock bottom, said person has every right to defend himself or herself. Oliver starts his speech by acknowledging he hurt Laurel to a degree and then goes on to name a number of things she unjustifiably pins on him (like her drinking and losing her job). Following that, he rightly tells her that she isn't the only one who's dealing with family issues and that she should stop acting as if she has it worse than everyone else. How are those fallacies and lies?
    Laurel didn't pin her drinking and losing her job on him. Oliver's lie is that he loves her. His fallacies are his issues against her like her blaming everyone else for her problems, while then getting onto her about his problems in him comforting her when she was prosecuting Moira. Laurel hadn't been blaming everyone else for her problems, she'd actually been blaming herself for things that were others problems.
    Prompting her to go and drink was purely out of frustration because in the weeks leading up to that he noticed her spiraling and couldn't get through to her. What was he supposed to do?
    Not encourage self-destructive tendencies just to make himself feel better about his problems.
    Keep being polite and letting her deteriorate? Sometimes tough love is required (and it's exactly what Felicity needed in 5.19 as well). And as it turns out, Oliver's behavior here was exactly the kick up the butt Laurel needed to turn her life around. So while he was "100% wrong", he must have done something right...
    No, he didn't. His wrong actions aren't justified by the better outcome. Oliver's intentions were to unleash his issues on her. He didn't care about helping her. She didn't turn her life around. She went down a path that ended in her death in only a few short years, which brought about no large good. She probably would've lived longer if he'd kept his nose out of her business just so he could throw a fit at her.
    Last edited by Dagenspear; 05-03-2017 at 12:18 AM.

  11. #71
    It's the mileage... costas22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagenspear View Post
    Laurel didn't pin her drinking and losing her job on him. Oliver's lie is that he loves her. His fallacies are his issues against her like her blaming everyone else for her problems, while then getting onto her about his problems in him comforting her when she was prosecuting Moira. Laurel hadn't been blaming everyone else for her problems, she'd actually been blaming herself for things that were others problems.
    If he didn't love her, he wouldn't have even bothered talking to her like this. He would have spared himself the headache and let her be. Oliver didn't go to her place that night with the intent to vent over his issues with Moira. He only brought them up to get his point across. It was Laurel who, in light of her life sucking at that point, took all of her issues out on Oliver, Sara and Quentin that night. And it's not a fallacy that Laurel was blaming others for her problems. She might not have outright said it, but her whole demeanor that night gave away someone who had serious issues but refused to acknowledge them and found it easier to go off on her family and friends. Just look at how she treated Quentin.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dagenspear View Post
    Not encourage self-destructive tendencies just to make himself feel better about his problems.
    Yes, because Laurel needed the encouragement. It's not like she was engaging her self-destructive tendencies despite the concerns of Oliver and Quentin until that point. What was he supposed to do? Say "Please don't drink or take pills anymore"? Take her by force to an AA meeting? Both of those worked really well...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dagenspear View Post
    No, he didn't. His wrong actions aren't justified by the better outcome. Oliver's intentions were to unleash his issues on her. He didn't care about helping her. She didn't turn her life around. She went down a path that ended in her death in only a few short years, which brought about no large good. She probably would've lived longer if he'd kept his nose out of her business just so he could throw a fit at her.
    His intention was to make her look herself in the mirror. Throughout that season he repeatedly and politely tried to get through to her and she shot him down by claiming she was fine. When that didn't work, he had 2 options: Let her go down the path she was on or try to shake her. He did the latter and it was exactly the wake up call she needed. As for her living longer if he didn't interfere, sorry but that's a misconception. Looking at the unescapable mess Laurel was in that season, she probably would have ended up dead in a ditch long before her eventual death.
    Last edited by costas22; 05-03-2017 at 05:42 AM.

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by BkWurm1 View Post
    =Kal El's Equal;8175942]

    Yeah, Chloe Sullivan was IMO the biggest hero on that show next to Clark. Clark rescued her but she saved his life just as much not to mention pulled the JL back together, shaped them up and saved all their butts at the sacrifice of herself again and again. Comparing Felicity to Chloe is only going to make me more proud of my girl.


    Just two episodes ago Oliver turned his back on the whole team and backed the Bratva against them. And yet they were willing to let him back on the team. Toward the end of season three he aligned himself with Malcolm Merlyn rather than his team, to the point of letting them think he was sending them all to their deaths and yet they forgave him and welcomed him back.

    Oliver isn't Felicity's boss. She's not his employee. She's his partner. Oliver himself keeps stressing this.

    And she's kept the team running while he's left to do his own thing more times than the opposite.

    I wish I was more surprised by the obvious double standard.
    They severely dumbed down Clark's intelligence in order to make Chloe relevant to the show. There was no need for Chloe Sullivan once they introduced Lois Lane to the show. She thought that she was superior to Clark - exactly like Felicity is to Oliver.

    As for not letting Oliver back on the team? WTF? It's his team. She works for him
    Last edited by Kal El's Equal; 05-03-2017 at 12:26 PM.

  13. #73
    Board Master Dagenspear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by costas22 View Post
    If he didn't love her, he wouldn't have even bothered talking to her like this. He would have spared himself the headache and let her be. Oliver didn't go to her place that night with the intent to vent over his issues with Moira. He only brought them up to get his point across. It was Laurel who, in light of her life sucking at that point, took all of her issues out on Oliver, Sara and Quentin that night. And it's not a fallacy that Laurel was blaming others for her problems. She might not have outright said it, but her whole demeanor that night gave away someone who had serious issues but refused to acknowledge them and found it easier to go off on her family and friends. Just look at how she treated Quentin.
    Laurel's issues with her crappy family aren't his business. He has no say. It is a fallacy, because Laurel has actively blamed herself for things that weren't her fault, showcasing a self-loathing, not an attack on others for her problems. Her issues with her family were based on what they'd done. Quentin trying to coerce his family back together. Sara and Oliver coming to her apartment as a couple. If he did lover her, he never would've come to her apartment on a date with the sister he cheated on her with and then encouraged her self destructive actions, even paying for them. People get onto people all the time when they don't love them. His actions and attitude are a showcase of not loving her.
    Yes, because Laurel needed the encouragement. It's not like she was engaging her self-destructive tendencies despite the concerns of Oliver and Quentin until that point. What was he supposed to do? Say "Please don't drink or take pills anymore"? Take her by force to an AA meeting? Both of those worked really well...
    Do nothing. It doesn't matter if Laurel needed encouragement. If someone wants to kill themself and you give them a gun and tell them to do it, you're still wrong.
    His intention was to make her look herself in the mirror. Throughout that season he repeatedly and politely tried to get through to her and she shot him down by claiming she was fine. When that didn't work, he had 2 options: Let her go down the path she was on or try to shake her. He did the latter and it was exactly the wake up call she needed. As for her living longer if he didn't interfere, sorry but that's a misconception. Looking at the unescapable mess Laurel was in that season, she probably would have ended up dead in a ditch long before her eventual death.
    Laurel actually accomplished more in alcoholism. She was the only who figured out that Sebastian Blood was shady. Laurel may have died sooner, but we all know for certain that she died in such a short time after this. Oliver's intention was to get onto her, not help her in any way. His entire attitude, actions and words are a showcase of that. His situation was one of lashing out, not help. Have a very great day!

    God bless you all!
    Last edited by Dagenspear; 05-03-2017 at 02:28 PM.

  14. #74
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    Shortly. Finally got around to watch this episode.

    Good things:

    Quentin & Rene scenes (really sweet scene with Rene and his daughter, and Quentin with tears in his eyes :'( instant angst).
    Amanda Waller references.
    Lyla scenes were okay.
    Both Felicity and Alena speak so fast that what they were saying was just slipping by so I didn't even try to focus too much.

    Bad sides of this episodes - everything else since it was quite a mess. I was mainly wondering:

    1. what those people are doing,
    2. why they are doing this,
    3. why they speak utter nonsense,
    4. why they do utter nonsense,
    5. what Helix is exactly doing (like agenta, objectives, mission etc.),
    6. why nobody has a problem with Alena killing that poor agent,
    7. is hacking an elevator even remotely possible?
    8. why Dig has so much problems with ARGUS prison since Team Flash and Team Arrow have their own prisons of the very some type (sending there criminals without trail, lawyer, psychiatric evaluation from Doctor Pressnall etc.),
    9. why there is zero arrows flying in the episode,
    10. why Curtis is cracking jokes that are not funny,
    11. why Oliver is not drinking vodka straight from the bottle (as he should after spending some time in Russia),
    12. come to think of that it didn't look as if he was drinking vodka but something else,
    13. why the most badass government agency has so crappy security,
    14. why Felicity is apparently not worried that her dear friends could be killed,
    15. why Oliver and the rest were not worried that Felicity could get hurt/arrested/killed if there was shootout,
    14. why someone thinks that giving a gun to someone who doesn't know how to shoot is really a perfect idea,
    15. but seriously what exactly is Helix's agenda?
    16. why almost all characters deliver their lines in such a way that I absolutely don't care what is happening on the screen?
    17. why people who wrote this episode are named professional writers?
    18. ...and get paid for this?
    19. ah, also - Helix "vigilantes" are wearing the masks, but Felicity and Alena don't - and it apparently is not problem.
    20. why Billy was never mentioned?
    21. did he got that funeral?
    .
    .
    .
    34. why there is no rain in Star City this time of the year,
    .
    .
    .
    44. what Diggles did with baby Sara John Jr.
    .
    .
    .
    49. srsly, Dig has just discovered what his wife is doing as ARGUS's boss?
    .
    .
    .
    52. Still no Doctor Pressnall - hey, Guggie promised that she will be back so I waiting for my fanservice!

    Overall it was not that bad - just really boring and not enganging for me except for the scenes with Rene and Quentin. I won't say a negative word about Felicity's make up though because all women, including Black Canary, Black Siren and Cupid have perfect one when they go out to preform their vigilantism/hunt down the Arrow etc.

  15. #75
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    I'm cackling! This was so funny....and it expresses my own feelings so well!

    1. What those people are doing

    Bickering about moral issues that have been rehashed ten times over already over the course of five seasons? Being college kids spouting technobabble and pretending to be super-dangerous hacktivists?

    2. why they are doing this

    Most of the time I didn't have a clue why anyone was doing what they were doing either.

    3. what Helix is exactly doing (like agenta, objectives, mission etc.),

    HELIX purpose and agenda remained a mystery to me as well!

    4. why nobody has a problem with Alena killing that poor agent,

    Yeah, Alena was like, "oops, something went wrong with my plan and a man was killed, but never mind, we have to focus on our Very Important Mission of rescuing SuperHacktivist Leader, who is being held by ARGUS for reasons!"

    5. is hacking an elevator even remotely possible?

    I have stopped trying to make sense of the "hacking" on this show! But if you can hack cranes, maybe you can hack elevators as well? My main objection is that "hacking" seems to incredibly easy on "Arrow". If Felicity can retrieve super secret information by hitting a few keys, I guess anyone can be a superintelligent superhacker, and hence they don't need Felicity!

    6. why Dig has so much problems with ARGUS prison since Team Flash and Team Arrow have their own prisons of the very some type (sending there criminals without trail, lawyer, psychiatric evaluation from Doctor Pressnall etc.),

    Diggle has gone from being Oliver's sassy partner/Black Driver and Hero Whisperer to the show's Resident Hypocrite (when he's not fulfilling his Olicity Cheerleader duties!).

    7. why there is zero arrows flying in the episode,

    Arrows??? In a Green Arrow show?? What an odd concept!


    8.. why Curtis is cracking jokes that are not funny,

    Has Curtis ever cracked jokes that ARE funny???

    9. why Oliver is not drinking vodka straight from the bottle (as he should after spending some time in Russia),

    I actually think it was whisky, but I'm not sure. I'm genuinely baffled that Oliver hasn't been hitting the bottle until now, considering everything he's been through. But it seems it took Prometheus to really break him.


    10. why almost all characters deliver their lines in such a way that I absolutely don't care what is happening on the screen?

    Maybe because the writing was so lackluster that they didn't even bother?

    11. ah, also - Helix "vigilantes" are wearing the masks, but Felicity and Alena don't - and it apparently is not problem.

    Aesthetic reasons?

    12. why Billy was never mentioned?

    Billy who????

    13. did he got that funeral?

    See my reply to 12!
    Last edited by evaba; 05-10-2017 at 04:10 AM.

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