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  1. #1
    The Force is Strong!!! darkphoenix21's Avatar
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    Where Do I Start Watching?

    I've been curious for a long time about watching Doctor Who. To start from day one of the series would be overwhelming. They have Doctor Who on Netflix starting from the 2005 series; I guess its the Ninth Doctor. Should I start from there (I've seen the first episode, Rose)?

  2. #2
    Forum Whiz gmster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkphoenix21 View Post
    I've been curious for a long time about watching Doctor Who. To start from day one of the series would be overwhelming. They have Doctor Who on Netflix starting from the 2005 series; I guess its the Ninth Doctor. Should I start from there (I've seen the first episode, Rose)?
    Yes. Rose is the best place for beginners to start. Just keep chugging along. The show finds its groove soon enough.

    After you're through with Series 2, you may start watching The Sarah Jane Adventures and Torchwood on the side. (Particularly Torchwood! The Series 1 finale leads directly into Doctor Who's third to last episode of Series 3.)

    You may watch any episode of the classic series anytime you want, including the TV Movie.

  3. #3
    The Force is Strong!!! darkphoenix21's Avatar
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    I'm on episode 7 of the first season and it's pretty good. I like Christopher Eccleston as the Doctor. It's too bad he only did this first season.

    One thing for sure, the aliens/creatures are so ridiculous in this series (the little I've seen). Where are they getting these things from. It's like they came out of Jim Henson's junkyard

  4. #4
    The Force is Strong!!! darkphoenix21's Avatar
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    I finished the first series and it was pretty good. I'm already well into series 2. I will hopefully be all caught up by early/late September.

  5. #5
    Unapologetic Chloe fan ArtgirlTexas's Avatar
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    I promise it gets better. I started with the 2005 series and was a little put-off by the cheap effects, but it got better so I kept watching.

    And now... hooked.

  6. #6
    The Force is Strong!!! darkphoenix21's Avatar
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    I'm on series 2 now and the effects are gradually getting better.

    At times its hard understanding what they're saying because of the accents but, it is what it is.

    I'm glad each series is only 13 episodes so I can get through one entire series each week given I watch 1-2 episodes a day.
    Last edited by darkphoenix21; 08-10-2013 at 02:51 PM.

  7. #7
    Forum Whiz gmster's Avatar
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    Good to hear a first-time watcher's reaction. Keep us updated as you get further.

  8. #8
    The Force is Strong!!! darkphoenix21's Avatar
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    I just finished watching The Doctor's Daughter episode in the 4th series....why didn't she get her own spin-off? The episode would have made a great backdoor pilot for Jenny. It would have resolved one issue with this series I've come to learn; which is the lack of diversity (skin color and sex) amongst the ever changing Doctors.

  9. #9
    The Force is Strong!!! darkphoenix21's Avatar
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    The story arc for the 11th Doctor has gone from interesting to so freakin' complicated. I'm on series 6....how many times can each character (even the Doctor) die, get resurrected, alter the timeline, explode the universe and I'm sure it's not even the half of it?

  10. #10
    Forum Whiz Tekken Force's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkphoenix21 View Post
    The story arc for the 11th Doctor has gone from interesting to so freakin' complicated. I'm on series 6....how many times can each character (even the Doctor) die, get resurrected, alter the timeline, explode the universe and I'm sure it's not even the half of it?
    Oh my dear phoenix...welcome to Doctor Who Under Stephen Moffat. I think most people who watched that at the time (2010/11) have since just given up trying to make it all make sense. I don't know what episode you're up to, but the complicated not making sense stuff is only going to continue.

  11. #11
    The Force is Strong!!! darkphoenix21's Avatar
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    I am on Day of the Moon on Netflix. It's the 2nd part of the 1969 episode...the episodes in general may be off by 1 cause they didn't include the Christmas Special this time around; The other series' did.

  12. #12
    The Force is Strong!!! darkphoenix21's Avatar
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    I'm half way through the 6th series and I have come to realize that there hasn't been continuity as far as previous Doctors/companions are concerned. There hasn't been any reference or even acknowledgement of past history or anything? Haven't seen any guest appearances from Rose, Martha, Donna, Sarah Jane... or just anyone from the Doctor's previous incarnations.

    I get the feeling now that Matt Smith's 11th Doctor was an unofficial reboot. Even the opening credits scream reboot; Amy's voice-over telling us how she met this time travelling alien and the many adventures they go on....come on, where is everyone else who accompanied the Doctor before Amy, Rory or River Song?
    Last edited by darkphoenix21; 08-29-2013 at 12:33 AM.

  13. #13
    Posting Pro newbaggy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkphoenix21 View Post
    I'm half way through the 6th series and I have come to realize that there hasn't been continuity as far as previous Doctors/companions are concerned. There hasn't been any reference or even acknowledgement of past history or anything? Haven't seen any guest appearances from Rose, Martha, Donna, Sarah Jane... or just anyone from the Doctor's previous incarnations.

    I get the feeling now that Matt Smith's 11th Doctor was an unofficial reboot. Even the opening credits scream reboot; Amy's voice-over telling us how she met this time travelling alien and the many adventures they go on....come on, where is everyone else who accompanied the Doctor before Amy, Rory or River Song?
    The Amy voiceover thing is purely a BBC America thing - the original UK versions don't have it. I assume that BBCA wanted a "this is what the show's about" explanation for US viewers - Brits don't need it because Doctor Who is an established part of our popular culture. As for The Eleventh Hour being an "unofficial reboot", there is a simple explanation - it is. To quote Steven Moffat:

    The biggest pressure will always be introducing a new Doctor. And I can’t imagine it will ever be tougher than with “The Eleventh Hour” because everything changed. It’s not an ideal way to run television. It really isn’t. That was mad. All the execs left, the producer left, and all the stars left. You think, “Christ, how do you get away with that?!” We’re not in that situation this time, and it’s good that we’re not. People say, “It must have been great and exciting and marvelous that you had all that new stuff,” but not really. But, we got away with it. I just remember thinking, “Are people going to buy that this is the same show, when it clearly is not?”
    This is the point where those familiar with the series original (1963-1989) run have the advantage over someone who has only seen the 21st century version. Don't worry - this doesn't mean that you need to watch episodes of the original series to understand the plots or characters of the modern stories. However, fans of the original series know that the series "regenerated" itself many times, just like the Doctor, as changes of producer and/or script editor (who were effectively the executive producers of their day) altered the creative direction of the show. Therefore, relative newbies might think "How can it change so much?" whilst old hands respond "It's Doctor Who - it's what it does. That's why it has lasted fifty years."

    On a related point, modern fans (and I have to say this applies more to the sort of people who are part of a fandom, rather than "general audience") often seem to expect a modern sci-fi/fantasy show to be heavy with serialized elements, continuity and callbacks designed to reward the more obsessive viewer. Doctor Who - with fifty years' worth of stories to keep track of - keeps to a much looser mythology that can be rewritten whenever the current creative team feels the need to do so. Again, this isn't new. 1975's Genesis of the Daleks was a Dalek origin story, written by their creator Terry Nation, that rewrote significant parts of their mythology (e.g. having called the race that created the Daleks "Dals" in his original stories, Nation renames them "Kaleds" in Genesis). Two years later, The Deadly Assassin made so many changes to the Time Lords (establishing a lot of mythology about the Doctor and his people that is still used now) that the then head of the Doctor Who Appreciation Society wrote a hysterical (and, in retrospect, hysterically funny) review claiming that writer Robert Holmes had brought about "the end of Doctor Who." Nowadays, things like the Time War, "time can be written," and the cracks in the universe were written into the show to provide excuses for inconsistencies in the series' continuity. Again, it is just Doctor Who being Doctor Who.

    As for not acknowledging past history, Russell T. Davies effectively did the same as Steven Moffat has done - concentrated on telling stories about the companions and semi-regular characters that he created. Yes, he brought back Sarah Jane, but that was purely because he wanted to do a story in which Rose (and new viewers) discover that there were female companions before her. That fact that new viewers took to Elisabeth Sladen so strongly that she earned her own spin-off was a happy accident (incidentally, she comes back in The Stolen Earth not as an acknowledgement of past history, but as part of a Doctor Who/Torchwood/The Sarah Jane Adventures crossover). There are references to the original run in the Ninth and Tenth Doctor episodes, but often in a subtle "something for the old fans" manner that newer viewers may not get. Steven Moffat does the same with the Eleventh Doctor, but knowing that the 50th Anniversary was coming, he seems to have held a lot back for then (again, the original series largely held back the the looking back at the past, bringing back Doctors and/or companions stuff for the big anniversaries). Wait until the second-half of Series 7, and you get more looking back at the past because it was the "50th Anniversary series." Also, RTD only really went big on bringing people back in Series 4, and Moffat has only made three series as Executive Producer, so you may be judging a little prematurely.
    Last edited by newbaggy; 08-30-2013 at 08:06 AM.

  14. #14
    Forum Whiz gmster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkphoenix21 View Post
    I'm half way through the 6th series and I have come to realize that there hasn't been continuity as far as previous Doctors/companions are concerned. There hasn't been any reference or even acknowledgement of past history or anything? Haven't seen any guest appearances from Rose, Martha, Donna, Sarah Jane... or just anyone from the Doctor's previous incarnations.
    Past companions make a TARDIS cameo in "Let's Kill Hitler".

    Quote Originally Posted by newbaggy View Post
    The Amy voiceover thing is purely a BBC America thing - the original UK versions don't have it. I assume that BBCA wanted a "this is what the show's about" explanation for US viewers - Brits don't need it because Doctor Who is an established part of our popular culture.
    The Amy voiceover is present in the PBS airings as well.

  15. #15
    Posting Pro newbaggy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmster View Post
    The Amy voiceover is present in the PBS airings as well.
    They must be using the BBC America versions as well. That makes sense - British and American picture transmission standards (frame rate, line count, etc.) still differ, so using a version already converted for US transmission saves time and money. Also, Netflix and PBS can assume that BBCA carried out any required checks for compliance with US laws and regulations.

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